energymiser101.typepad.com > Insulation Project

Here are photos showing the steps involved in insulating our attic. They detail how the workers pumped insulation from their truck outside through our open window and into two areas of our third floor--the easily accessible space in the attic storage area, and the less-accessible spot behind the walls in the living area.

Insulation truck

Insulation truck

The truck carried the insulation and a compressor that would force the material into the hose and up into the third-floor window.


Hose running through window

Hose running through window

Here's a view from the third-floor stairway showing the hose running through the window from the outside.


Hose running up the stairs

Hose running up the stairs

From the window, the hose ran up the stairs to the third floor living area.


Hose running into attic area

Hose running into attic area

Here, the hose is running into the attic area. The workers had to drill holes into the wooden floor between each of the joists.


Blowing insulation under floor

Blowing insulation under floor

The worker is blowing insulation into one of the holes. Our attic is about 30 feet in depth, and they cut holes roughly in the center and then blew insulation in both directions. They made extra holes around the fireplace.


Plugs in floor

Plugs in floor

You can see nine of the wooden plugs used to fill the holes on the attic floor where the workers blew insulation into the spaces between the joists.


Preparing to cut through wall

Preparing to cut through wall

There was no direct access to the attic on the other side of the third-floor living area, so the workers had to cut an access hole through the wall. In this photo they're just about to begin the cut.


Making the cut

Making the cut

Here they are making the cut with a power saw. They were neat in their work and caught most of the plaster dust from the saw with a vacuum cleaner.


Finished cut

Finished cut

The final cut had to be large enough for the smallest of the workers to crawl through. There wasn't much room because they didn't want to compromise the structural integrity of the wall by cutting away the center stud.

If you look closely, you'll see the original insulation in the attic. It's not enough to cover the joists--probably just fine when heating fuel was 30 cents a gallon 40 years ago, or even for earlier when the house was heated by a coal furnace, but woefully inadequate protection at today's high heating costs.


Wall-opening patch

Wall-opening patch

After the workers finished their insulation work in the attic space behind the living area, they sealed the opening with wallboard. It looks rough now, but we're having painters give it a smooth finish, remove the old wallpaper and then apply new paint all around.


Rough wall hole patches

Rough wall hole patches

These are the rough patches over the holes in the wall where the workers were able to blow in insulation without having to cut an opening. These, too, will be smoothed over by the painters. They only needed to make five of these holes.